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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 204 (some duplicates have been removed)
of these islamist authoritarian governments. what are the consequences of that? in syria you talk about al qaeda presence. it's unlikely an al qaeda affiliated group will take over syria or egypt. greater likelihood perhaps in egypt and not even there. what is american influence look like -- what should it look like in this post revolutionary period when there was so much excitement about the prospect of egyptian democracy taking root in way that would be in concert with the u.s. at a time when there are people very critical of the o bama administration for essentially getting out of the way, letting the revolution happen and then turning their backs on the likes of mubarak who could have at least guaranteed some level of stability? >> i think it was an illusion to imagine that we could somehow have shut the flood gates and prevented the revolution in egypt. backing mubarak wasn't an option. and i think the president did the right thing by trying to get on the right side of history there. but now the challenge of the post revolutionary phase in egypt is to try to work with a government there tha
is when the boomers turn 67 when they start getting sick and drawing down on the government's health benefit programs. what do you think about that? >> right. well, look, this is a president that's completely wedded to the social welfare state of the 20th century, looking to advantage the agenda as far as into the 21st century as possible. this is a president who nationalized our health care system, and as bob noted, trying to take that agenda to energy policy and climate change. we've seen it already, manufacturing the whole idea of green energy jobs, and in effect, trying to get rid of traditional energy. i think that we have to be very aware of what's happening here. i think there was a lot of fancy language used in the inaugural address, but the fact is that that doesn't cover up what's really going on here, which is to grow the progressive state. liz: let me back up, listen, we've. covering this issue for awhile now with fox news and fox business, and here's the issue. will the u.s. start looking like a mature european country? is the u.s. coming towards, you know, sort of an id
that the president was going to slow down on some government initiatives, think again. we will get into the details in the second. here is how it was received across the globe. u.s. futures are up about 19 points. similar gains in the s&p 500 and nasdaq. the nasdaq. the first two are already at five year highs. the nasdaq is a long way from that. it has more to do with their currency, the nikkei is up. less to do with the inauguration of barack obama today. but perhaps it was something that would get in the way of some of the good economic fortunes they see downwind. the markets little dissuaded by anything that happened today. despite concerns that republicans feel that they are going to get the short of the stick -- short end of the stick from the president. chuck schumer is the latest essay, to say, as you know, if it comes to another budget that will be stressful, republicans may not like it, but they will have to deal with it. i will have more on the attitude in the approach of the president. i didn't see anything shocking or the president. he is kind of echoing what he already has said. maybe
government actually reacted quite favorably and also responded to our demand with a change, a certain change in their policies. i must admit that i looked with a certain degree of concern at japan right now. for europe, too, it's going to be important, um, that the big injection of liquidity that was given into the markets for the sake of the banks is siphoned off again. but i think the ecb is, actually, here a very positive force. they're playing a very positive role, and they will see to it that one refrains from the policy of manipulation and that, um, one pursues a policy that actually reflects the situation as it is that everyone is doing it as is the ecb. i think we would have less problems all over the world, but that's about the extent of my comment. [speaking german] >> translator: since you've touched upon central banks, what exactly are the objectives of central banks? we have the federal reserve that has set itself an additional objective, we've seen the more recent developments in japan. what did you think about the independence? you touched upon it, alluded to it. maybe you cou
and drawing down on the government's health benefit programs. what do you think about that? >> right. well, look this is a president that's completely wedded to the social welfare state of the 20th century, looking to advantage the agenda as far as into the 21st century as possible. this is a president who nationalized our health care system, and as bob noted, trying to take that agenda to energy policy and climate change. we've seen it already manufacturing the whole idea of green energy jobs, and in effect, trying to get rid of traditional energy. i think that we have to be very aware of what's happening here. i think there was a lot of fancy language used in the inaugural address, but the fact is that that doesn't cover up what's really going on here, which is to grow the progressive state. liz: let me back up listen, we've. covering this issue for awhile now with fox news and fox business, and here's the issue. will the u.s. start looking like a mature european country? is the u.s. coming towards you know, sort of an i
the u.s. should be governed and should govern itself. i would almost characterize it as something along the lines of a response to what we heard from president reagan in 1981 when he said government is not the solution to our problems, it is the problem. president obama making the case that the government is not necessarily our problem. together we could do great things. together we could take care of the elderly. together we can create a health care system for those who may not be able to afford it. very much discussing ways about how there should be some in society you don't have all or should not be some in society you have all at the expense of all others. he made and not to climate change, something that he had not necessarily highlighted or focused on in his first demonstration. moving forward in tackling debt and deficits, he did talk about tax reform. talk about slowing the growth of these expenses, but still no change in his governing philosophy, if not impassioned defense of his governing philosophy. we have heard from democrats and republicans not throughout the day calling f
about trying it help this government stand up security and deal with what is a very dangerous environment, from east to west, then we have to work together. i also hope we're looking forward, because right now, libya is still dangerous, it is still in a very unstable status, and whatever we can do for them, we at least ought to agree we need to do and get out there and start delivering. >> one of the members of the senate foreign relations committee, who is asking questions, is the new hampshire senator jean chacin, former governor, democratic member of the committee, who was in the hearing room. you're joining us right now from the russell building. senator shaheen? and as we wait for senator shaheen to get all hooked up there and get the audio straightened out, we've been talking about hillary clinton's testimony today in the senate. this afternoon she's going to be testifying in the house, the house foreign relations committee, which has been just as tough, if not more so than the senators have been, on the record of why susan rice was the person going out on the sunday tal
a new coalition government. >> sreenivasan: and ray suarez updates the high-powered meetings of heads of state, business leaders, and others at the world economic forum in davos, switzerland. >> brown: from mali, lindsey hilsum looks at tensions caused by government troops as they advance into islamist territory. >> sreenivasan: spencer michels has a story about trash and one city's crusade to eliminate all of it. >> reporter: san francisco boasts that it recycles 80% of all garbage, and is aiming for zero waste. but some skeptics don' believe it. >> brown: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnee.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for
? >> i would say little to nothing. i mean, you had a little bit of throat clearing about how government can't be the answer to every problem but it was a bold, strong progressive push. i think he learned a lesson were last time where he came in 2009 and tried to hold the g.o.p.'s hand and get something done but then got zero from the house in his stimulus bill. it's time to convince people, push ahead with your agenda and let the republicans do what they will. >> do you think we'll see this happen in the next 18 months. it does seem that the president learned something in the last four years. keep in mind the president said it's time to end on focusing on childish things. he said we need to stop the political name calling but the president is much more realistic, he understands that there are people who want to battle him on every issue. and the president was essentially rallying his base, liberals women african-americans, gay, latinos, look, we have big fights coming. in order to honor you i need you to honor me by working together in for the collective good and by the way we'll have s
.s. in the world. if there is a humanitarian crisis, it is justifiable to enter the country to stop the government from doing that. but if its is you are just unseating leaders because they're not friendly to u.s. business interests or you are replacing them with leaders who are firmly to u.s. business interests, that it does become imperialism. bowlines are really blurry and we have to watch our step. military industrial complex in this country is really powerful. i don't want it to spill over to the rest of the world and become the imperialists. host: a few tweets -- and joseph writes -- that is assessing the passed four years. i want to read from the oliver north peace that we mentioned earlier from the washington times, talking about hillary clinton and her assessment of her work. it says it has created opportunities for u.s. citizens in places that have benefited our nation. oliver north is the host of stories."ar mike is next on the republican line in indianapolis. caller: in the last four years, the only factor in the cap of hillary clinton is the miles she has trouble. a relationship to in
of mass destruction. we were told by every level of government here there were iraqi weapons of mass destruction that justified a war, the invasion of the united states. we are still searching for those weapons. they didn't exist. thousands of americans lost their lives. we could have a hearing on that if you'd like. >> ifill: while the benghazi attack was the main focus, secretary clinton also turned her attention to upheaval elsewhere in north africa. >> benghazi did not happen in a vacuum. the arab revolutions have scrambled power dynamics and shattered security forces across the region. instability in mali has created an expanding safe haven for terrorists who look to extend their influence and plot further attacks of the kind we saw just last week in algeria. >> ifill: in mali, elements of al qaeda in the islamic maghreb, known as a.q.i.m., have seized a large swath of territory, prompting france to intervene militarily with air power and ground troops. the u.s. military is providing transport flights to aid the french, and clinton said other assistance is under consideration. >
governments on the other side of the continent. we're for starting duties at some demonstrations of athens, madrid and rome. restarting casein in berlin, helsinki and the hague and of course were saying this frustration with the e.u. vary dramatically here in the united kingdom. europe's leaders have a duty to hear these concerns. indeed we have a duty to act on them and not just to fix the problems in the euro zone, but if in any emergency should plan for the amount as well as dealing with the present crisis center in the midst of present challenges we should plan for the future and what the world will look like when difficulties in the euro zone have been overcome. the biggest danger to the european union comes not from those who advocate change, but those who denounce new thinking is heresy. in its long history, europe has experienced heretics that turned out to have point. my point is this. for the same will not secure long-term future for the euro zone. more of the sample not fit the european union keeping pace with the new powerhouse economies. more of the same will not ring the euro
. whether the taliban will be resurgent, whether the government in afghanistan that will succeed president karzai's will be able to stand. those issues when you push the white house on them i tend to get people saying, look, we're ending these wars. we'll dole with what comes down the road. but we're not going to be deterred from our course. they think thos crucial strategically. they think they're in the business of reestablishing america's image abroad pre-9/11. reestablishing america's alliances and they think they've done that in the first four years and they want to continue it. and finally, the thing that is at the center of the white house's strategic thinking is this idea of rebalancing american power toward asia to dole with the rising china. they don't want anything to get in the way of that, even to the point of leaving what a lot of people fear is a vacuum of american power in areas that traditionally have been crucial to have american power, like the middle east. >> rose: but there's also, when you lock at who is happening in mali and you lock at sort of things that are happen
. >> thank you so much for having me. >> change has already come. european governments are worried about the threat of terrorism in benghazi, libya, they are urging their citizens to leave immediately. britain, germany, and the netherlands have intelligence of a specific and imminent threat against westerners in the city a week after foreign hostages were seized and killed in algeria and four months after the u.s. ambassador was killed in benghazi. no one is taking any chances. our security correspondent reports. >> and other terrorist threat in north africa. the foreign office told all britons in benghazi to leave immediately because of a specific and imminent danger. >> this is a turbulent part of north africa and the whole of the region, north africa is an area where various militant groups organize. want to prevent that threat but we have got to put the safety of british citizens first. >> libyan officials say the warning to them by surprise. >> this announcement hints at something that is not exist on the ground. this is not justified enough in our opinion. >> only a few months ago,
employees will face furloughs and reduced paychecks by april. the government of syria called today for thousands of refugees to come home, including those opposed to the regime. nearly 600,000 syrians have fled the civil war and gone to neighboring countries. there's been a new surge this week. we have a report narrated by alex thomson of independent television news. >> the children say they double-checked their figures. they counted around 10,000 children in the overcrowded camps in jordan in just the past 24 hours, with the parents or gardens they recognized around 20,000 people in all. with the winter cold and conditions like this, in the camps, king abdullah of jordan took the might of these people to the top today, to the world economic summit in davous. >> jordan is hosting almost 300,000. the weakest ref gos are struggling now just to survive this year's harsh winter. more international support is desperately needed. and it's only going to get worse. >> back there syria it is indeed getting worse. these people filmed getting out and leaving in the past 24 hours. it's partly
if we recognize the new somaly government which could never have been possible out -- without the support, the u.n. was strongly behind it, we got other nations to invest. what we're looking at in west africa is to try to help support an african a.u. supported troop combination from a number of countries to really take the lead against the terrorists in northern mali. . this is hard. if the united states comes in and does something on her own, nobody can match us in military assets and prowess, but a lot of the challenges we face are not immediately or sustainbly solved by military action alone, therefore, we have to get countries in the region to increase their border security and increase their counterterrorist efforts inside their own boards. we have a lot to do now in west africa. so i think you're right to point out, the united states has to play a role, but it needs to be part of a multi lateral effort in order to have a chance at success. >> thank you, madam secretary. we have discussed many important issues. i remain concerned about whether the accountability review bo
be getting rid of classes about government. seems like aecessary lesson. we will have you brew on that in a moment. first a look at the gas prices. national average 3.32 unchanged from yesterday. lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >> good morning to you. it is quarter after the hour. here's what you missed while you were sleeping. junior seau is now hitting the nfl with a lawsuit. his death is the result of head injuries that they hid the danger of. >>> he was criticized for fail to go alert public officials about the botched fast and furious operation. now he is reportedly stepping down from his post at the department of justice. he has been assistant attorney general since 2009 we don't know yet when he will leave. heather? >> days after the second term the administration is equipping egypt with state of the art weaponry. ainsley is joins us wi
to be the nation states where we already are seeing cyber intrusions' both against our government and against private sector, but increasingly common on state actors will have more capacity to disrupt and to hack into put out false information to accuse the united states of things that can light five years before we can put them out. so, you know, i think it's important we have a really thoughtful comprehensive review about the threats of today and tomorrow and that will help guide the committee and the senate and the administration working together to answer them. >> thank you madam chair and onto something that hasn't been done. i'm going to yield back the rest of my time. >> we will not go to mr. perot of texas pittard >> thank you mr. chairman and madame secretary for your service to the country. gordon roland from oregon, frederick from texas and victor am i district of texas, three americans overseas killed not in benghazi, that killed at a remote gas facility in algeria. killed in my opinion because they were americans. over the last weekend, myself and others have tried to get informa
to that u.s. for training. there were some who led the military coup, which overthrew the elected government. that is worrisome for us. we asked ourselves questions. did we miss the signs that this was happening? was there anything that we did in our training that was -- that could have been done differently and caused a different outcome? i think that the answer is a little bit of both. as we look at this from a purely military standpoint, we were focusing our training almost exclusively on tactical or technical matters. how to operate various pieces of equipment and how to improve effectiveness or tactical operations and the like. i see that there kernel is a paratrooper. -- colonel is a paratrooper. all of those things are very good. we did spend the requisite time focusing on values, ethics, and a military egos that says -- e cos that says when you put on aim u of the nation, you accept responsibility to defend and th protect that nation and abide by the legitimate authority that has been established duri an conductor sells to the rule of law and to see yourself as servants of people of
-30% greater than nonunion wages and this is an alliance between the government and corporations to demonize the labor unions, starting in the 60s if of -- with union busting and now the state level, 24 states passing right-to-work laws where people are paid yes. yes, there is slight job growth but these are not living wage. so who has the broken business model? >> who has the jobs. >> carolyn, there's a reason why in right-to-work states people are paid -- what did you say 2-30% less than union workers? >> you no what dells excuse me, carolyn, didn't interrupt you. >> you just laughed during my segment. >> i didn't. because what you're saying is outlandish, when we have historic unemployment, and in right-to-work states, there are more jobs and a better quality of living because we don't have these these artificially inflated health benefits. >> who caused this unemployment? that was the financial sector tanking economy. >> when is president obama going to take responsibility for this economy. let's to -- >> what happened in 2007 when he was in the senate -- >> i want to go back to hoste
, but they have been working off a continuing resolution which funds the government for certain amount of time. it will end on march 27. house leaders tried to put forward or sketched out a game plan for how they would handle things going forward. the first step in all this is the vote today on a short-term debt limit extension. host: seth, you mentioned the republican retreat last week and on conversations with conservatives, an event on capitol hill yesterday. what kind of dissent did you hear from conservative republicans on the debt ceiling vote? guest: they want to make sure that they get some sort of deficit reduction out of this. i think it makes them a little nervous. this is what many will referred to as a clean vote on the debt ceiling, if they're not a lot of strings attached. they would like to see more deficit reduction. i think they are a little weary that leadership will follow through on their promises. so it is within that vein. i guess i would say that conservative lawmakers, at least the most conservative, wants to be cautiously optimistic that house leaders might follow thr
yesterday with secretary of state clinton was that america is dealing with nations whose own governments are in a shambles. and yet people like conservative chris stevens thought itthe bes way to make progress was to be there. you say we have to have relationships with these nations, but if those governments are in such a shambles, what's the alternative. how do we resolve that? >> i'm glad you raised those points. i know a lot of not only military personnel who are very brave but state department personnel who are very brave and yet when they take risks and when a benghazi consulate is overrun, we consider that fundamentally unacceptable. it is a terrible tragedy, but it is part of the risk in this world of being in places where you need to be when situations are not always stable. now, to your point about whether all governments can be worked with or cooperated with, of course, there are some governments that just aren't even trying or are in ka hoocah against us. but in a place like libya, i think the real issue is how do we get that young government get on its feet. it's generally we
many departments throughout government, has numbers of challenges. we saw systemic issues that nide to be addressed and they're in the process of being addressed right now. our nation has budgetary constraints, which means that in all of these departments, creativity is going to have to be utilized to make sure we make the most of what we have and making sure that our u.s. interests are put forth. we have a world that is a dangerous world. and things continue to come over the transom. sometimes it's at surprising times. i know as secretary of state, you're going to have to lead our country in addressing those as they come about. i do hope that you'll work closely with this committee as you have worked very closely with this committee over the last many years. and helping us work with you to make sure that as we move ahead, we move ahead together. and that it's seamless. we have many challenges, and i know on monday, president obama said that america will remain the anchor of strong challenges in every corner of the globe. and we will renew those institutions that extend our capacity
have to stay united and we have to show that if given the chance, we can govern. we have better ideas. >> you know, the fact is, that we are not in the wilderness. republicans control the house and most state houses. >> molly live with us tonight. molly, congressman ryan said that republicans will have a stronger argument in the president's second term, why >> because he said that now republicans can show voters what actually happens when the president's agenda is implemented. >> in the president's first term we argued against big government in theory n second term, we'll argue about big government in practice it is not a bill. it is 13,000 pages of regulation and growing and implemented. this year the law will restrict our ability to use flexibility pending account . restrict life saving devices. >> paul ryan said republicans should be prepared for the president to delejet myself them and urged them to be smart in the battles they pick. >> molly as we watch the news unfold on saturday, it was obvious that ryan is not the only person talking about this. is this a broader gop reset? >>
in the government, targeting americans that we thought were involved in terrorism, such as anwar al-awlaki, jamie. >> jamie: thank you so much for the look there. thank you. and as peter mentioned the federal court of appeals did unanimously ruled that president obama violated the constitution when he bypassed with a recess appointments that involved three vacancies to the national labor relations board. a tactic both parties used to keep presidents appointing people they don't like and the president claims he acted properly because the senate was away for the holidays, but the federal court didn't agree, instead that the senate was still technically in session. what does it mean for the country's labor board and union battles that are raging across our country? well, coming up, we're going to take a very interesting look at this with jay sekulow and one of the attorneys arguing that the administration had violated our constitution. he will join us live just moments away. >> now more than ever we must do these things together as one nation and one people. my fellow americans, we are made for thi
a volley and government. the democrats typically say, well, government can do this or can't do that ask so it's really a series of arguments over the role of government and the second thing i'm curious to know about is how tough they were in a pretty partisan atmosphere. he has gotten tougher over the past couple of years with the opposition. how feist you he is he during the speech. >> things people have picked up in this run up to this inauguration is that the president four years ago in his speech came tout and he actually made a comment about how he was going to to bring an end to the petty grievances and false promises in washington. now four years later was that a false promise? >> yes. i mean, the president, i think, understandably confident and an historic election and all of that perhaps overstated what could be done. this is one place where he seen having come fiercely short and it's in bringing that sense to washington of bipartisanship and of working together and overcoming partisanship and his defenders and supporters will say oh, the republicans have been intransient and smal
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 204 (some duplicates have been removed)